Behind the scenes

I wanted to share a couple of photos of what goes on before and during the making of each panel.

I’m not sure how other people work their patterns out, but mine goes a little something like this:

outlander_graph

 

I make the graph up in Excel, print it, and figure out each row using a trusty ruler and pencil. If there’s an easier way, I’d love to hear about it! I type up the instructions (having fun deciphering my scribbles at times) and then use that to crochet my panel. This lets me find out if I’ve made any errors along the way, which I usually have. I fix them up before sharing them, but if I’ve left one in please let me know so I can fix it.

Once I’ve finished the panel, I continue on with the edging. I didn’t do this with my Doctor Who blanket, but I really wish I did. It would’ve been a lot faster and easier had I done it this way.

outlander_edging

After I’ve joined the last block, I turn it so the right side is facing me, chain three, and then single stitch into the gap between the next blocks. I work my way all around (sc, ch3, repeat) until I’m back at the beginning. This is the last chain section, and after this I sc into the next gap and finish off, leaving a tail to weave in later. When it comes time to joining the squares, they’re ready to go.

I’m also weaving the ends in as I go this time, rather than leaving it to do once all the panels are finished. I’m not a fan of weaving ends. I mean, look at it!

Outlander_CAL_02a

I like to leave a long tail to make weaving them in easier, so I end up with a pile of snipped ends. My daughter loves to play with them (meaning: make mess), so I guess it’s a win/win. Especially when it ends up like this:

Outlander_CAL_02b

That’s much better. I haven’t blocked them as yet, and probably won’t because I’m feeling a bit lazy. And sore.Very sorey. I have arthritis in my knees and hands and it’s been hurting a hell of a lot this week, so I haven’t been able to work as much or as fast as I’d like. The squares will all settle down nicely once it’s together and in use.

I’m finding that the weaving stage isn’t as overwhelming or annoying as it was when I had nine panels to do in a row, and it doesn’t take as long when you’re doing one at a time. As much as I want to dive into the next panel straight away, I do feel it’s better to finish one off completely before I start the next.

signature

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: